‘India must NOT become like Pakistan’: Exiled Bangladeshi author Taslima Nasrin wants …

Posted on Oct 25 2016 - 5:30am
48
--------- Advertisement ---------

------------------

'India must NOT become like Pakistan': Exiled Bangladeshi author Taslima Nasrin wants ... family, wedding pictures, age, height, weight, biography

  • Bangladeshi author Taslima Nasrin is upset over the ban imposed on Pakistani actors
  • Nasrin is living in exile in India after facing death threats from fundamentalists in Bangladesh for her book Lajja
  • Her latest memoir ‘Exile’ reveals the attitude of West Bengal and Rajasthan government
  • See more news from India at www.dailymail.co.uk/indiahome

Utpal Kumar

--------- Advertisement ---------

------------------

--------- Advertisement ---------

------------------

View
comments

Noted Bangladeshi author Taslima Nasrin is upset over the ban imposed on Pakistani actors in India. 

She believes the country, her ‘home’ right now, is in danger of becoming another Pakistan or Bangladesh if the powers-that-be don’t restrain the fundamentalists. 

--------- Advertisement ---------

------------------

“When I say that these actors should not be banned, my premise is that India should not become the photocopy of Pakistan,” says Nasrin, who is living in exile in India after facing death threats from fundamentalists in Bangladesh. 

Taslima Nasrin emphasised that India’s skewed sense of secularism is not just hurting the country’s liberal credentials, but also giving rise to the Right-wing.
Taslima Nasrin emphasised that India’s skewed sense of secularism is not just hurting the country’s liberal credentials, but also giving rise to the Right-wing.

Taslima Nasrin emphasised that India’s skewed sense of secularism is not just hurting the country’s liberal credentials, but also giving rise to the Right-wing.

“I totally understand such sentiments in the country as so many people have been killed by Pakistan-based and Pakistan-inspired terrorists. But banning actors is hardly a solution.” 

Nasrin’s words have come in the wake of filmmaker Karan Johar’s statement pledging he would not “engage with talent” from Pakistan in future. 

In the aftermath of the Uri terror attack last month, in which 19 Indian jawans were killed, Johar’s latest film Ae Dil Hai Mushkil faced the Maharashtra Navnirman Sena’s ire over Pakistani actor Fawad Khan.

Fatwa was issued on Taslima after the release of Lajja
Fatwa was issued on Taslima after the release of Lajja

Fatwa was issued on Taslima after the release of Lajja

“I felt sad when I heard Karan’s highly emotional statement and the way he was arm-twisted to go for compromise with Raj Thackeray. It shouldn’t have happened in the first place. 

There are several anti-terrorist people in Pakistan too. We should encourage such elements rather than club them with jihadis,” says the controversial Lajja author as she reminds how she herself hails from Bangladesh which, according to her, is now beyond redemption. 

“I don’t see myself ever going back to Bangladesh, howsoever I may want to. It is beyond redemption, with the liberal space shrinking by the day,” says Nasrin. 

She reminds how more than two dozen liberal writers, artists and bloggers have been killed in Bangladesh over the past three years.

Nasrin emphasizes that it is India’s skewed sense of secularism that is not just hurting the country’s liberal credentials but also, in reaction, giving rise to the Right-wing.

View of a book stall where copies of the new book of Bangladeshi writer Taslima Nasreen is on display (bottom row)
View of a book stall where copies of the new book of Bangladeshi writer Taslima Nasreen is on display (bottom row)

View of a book stall where copies of the new book of Bangladeshi writer Taslima Nasreen is on display (bottom row)

“Criminals are here free to do whatever they want to, while people like me are punished for telling the truth,” says the author as she recalls how she was packed off to Jaipur in 2007 by the West Bengal government after she was attacked by the Muslim fanatics in Hyderabad. 

“Instead of arresting those goons, I was accused of inciting violence. I believe the then Left Front government used my case to divert attention of Muslims from its Nandigram excesses.”

The author, in her latest memoir, Exile, reveals how the West Bengal government even lied to its Rajasthan counterpart, then run by the BJP, that she would be visiting Jaipur for a literature festival.

“I realised the falsehood soon after I reached the Pink City. The authorities in Rajasthan were told that I had come to attend a literature festival, about which I had no information. 

Taslima Nasreen's supporters protesting the cancellation of the launch of the Bangladeshi author's new book at the Kolkata Literary Meet (file picture)
Taslima Nasreen's supporters protesting the cancellation of the launch of the Bangladeshi author's new book at the Kolkata Literary Meet (file picture)

Taslima Nasreen’s supporters protesting the cancellation of the launch of the Bangladeshi author’s new book at the Kolkata Literary Meet (file picture)

I couldn’t go back to Kolkata thereafter, despite my several attempts to do so.” It was the second exile for her. But what hurt her most was that it happened this time in India, that too in the “highly progressive state” of West Bengal. 

“The primary reason for this is the distorted interpretation of secularism that has found currency in India. Here, in the name of minority protection, the fanatics are being given shelter. 

The people who should be jailed are given free run, while people like me who raise their voices against terrorism, communalism and gender justice are forced into silence and submission,” says she.  

Read more:

--------- Advertisement ---------

------------------
‘India must NOT become like Pakistan’: Exiled Bangladeshi author Taslima Nasrin wants … was last modified: October 25th, 2016 by greendecker

This article was originally published on http://www.dailymail.co.uk/indiahome/indianews/article-3868142/India-NOT-like-Pakistan-Exiled-Bangladeshi-author-Taslima-Nasrin-wants-fundamentalists-restrained-India.html