‘Drinking from the glass of martyrdom’: Lashkar-e-Taiba takes credit for Uri attack which killed 20 …

Posted on Oct 26 2016 - 9:31am
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'Drinking from the glass of martyrdom': Lashkar-e-Taiba takes credit for Uri attack which killed 20 ... lyrics, song mp3 download, family, wedding pictures, age, height, weight, biography

  • Posters put up by L-e-T ask residents to pray for a terrorist who was killed referring to him as a ‘lion-hearted holy warrior’
  • When presented with evidence on the Uri attacks, Pakistan denied it 
  • See more news from India at www.dailymail.co.uk/indiahome 

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L-e-T posters in Gujranwala town of Punjab called for last rites for one of the terrorists
L-e-T posters in Gujranwala town of Punjab called for last rites for one of the terrorists

L-e-T posters in Gujranwala town of Punjab called for last rites for one of the terrorists

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In first-hand evidence of a Pakistan-based terror group carrying out last month’s Uri attack, Lashkar-e-Taiba (LeT) put up posters across Gujranwala town in Pakistan’s Punjab province claiming responsibility for the killing of 20 Indian soldiers.

The posters also called for the last rites of one of the four terrorists who were killed in the attack. 

They announce that the LeT will be holding the last rites in absentia for Gujranwala resident Muhammad Anas, one of the four terrorists involved in the attack on an Army base in Uri in Kashmir, and asked local residents to join in.

The posters ask residents to pray for the “lion-hearted holy warrior Abu Siraqa Muhammad Anas, who sent 177 Hindu soldiers to hell at the Uri Brigade camp in occupied Kashmir, and thus drank from the glass of martyrdom”. 

Hafiz Saeed, who heads the Jamaat-ud-Dawa, which is the parent organisation of the LeT, figures prominently on the posters, along with other members of the terror organisation. 

Protesters burn posters of a film starring a Pakistani actor Fawad Khan after the attack on the Indian army camp in Uri, close to the Line of Control which divides India and Pakistan
Protesters burn posters of a film starring a Pakistani actor Fawad Khan after the attack on the Indian army camp in Uri, close to the Line of Control which divides India and Pakistan

Protesters burn posters of a film starring a Pakistani actor Fawad Khan after the attack on the Indian army camp in Uri, close to the Line of Control which divides India and Pakistan

The posters nail Pakistan’s denial that its non-state actors were not behind the pre-dawn attack on the Army camp last month, which triggered one of the worst India-Pakistan standoffs in recent years. 

Pakistani demonstrators chant slogans against Indian government and burn an effigy of Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi earlier this month
Pakistani demonstrators chant slogans against Indian government and burn an effigy of Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi earlier this month

Pakistani demonstrators chant slogans against Indian government and burn an effigy of Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi earlier this month

The Uri attack was followed by the Indian Army’s surgical strikes, which dismantled at least seven terror launch pads and killed an unknown number of terrorists and their sympathisers across the Line of Control. 

India has also been on the diplomatic offensive in its attempt to isolate Pakistan globally with Prime Minister Narendra Modi calling it a ‘mother ship of terror’ earlier this month. 

A convoy of Indian troopers pass through the border line area in Uri sector, where tensions are running high after the attack last month. The Uri attack was followed by strikes from the Indian army (above) which killed an unknown number of terrorists 
A convoy of Indian troopers pass through the border line area in Uri sector, where tensions are running high after the attack last month. The Uri attack was followed by strikes from the Indian army (above) which killed an unknown number of terrorists 

A convoy of Indian troopers pass through the border line area in Uri sector, where tensions are running high after the attack last month. The Uri attack was followed by strikes from the Indian army (above) which killed an unknown number of terrorists 

India had even called off its participation in the SAARC summit that was scheduled to be held in Islamabad in protest. 

Other SAARC member states – Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Nepal and Bhutan – had followed suit and refused to participate in the SAARC summit, forcing Pakistan to call it off. 

Modi had even flayed Pakistan at the BRICS-BIMSTEC summit in Goa, in which he found the backing of several countries. 

On the contrary, Pakistan, despite being isolated globally, continues to deny the activities of terror groups on its soil. 

Pakistani Army soldiers shift coffins containing bodies of Police cadets for burial to their home towns, following an attack by militants in Quetta, Pakistan
Pakistani Army soldiers shift coffins containing bodies of Police cadets for burial to their home towns, following an attack by militants in Quetta, Pakistan

Pakistani Army soldiers shift coffins containing bodies of Police cadets for burial to their home towns, following an attack by militants in Quetta, Pakistan

When presented with evidence on the Uri attacks, Pakistan not only denied it, but its defence minister Khawaja Asif even suggested that it was an insider job. 

In retaliation, India threatened to scrap the Indus Water Treaty and contemplated giving refuge to Baloch activists. 

The Uri attack did not spare the film industry as well, with fringe right-wing organisations calling for a ban on movies starring Pakistani actors and asking Pakistani actors to leave India for not denouncing the brazen attack. 

The Raj Thackeray-led Maharashtra Navnirman Sena even demanded that all Indian producers who have cast Pakistani actors in their movies should pay Rs 5 crore towards the Army welfare fund. 

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‘Drinking from the glass of martyrdom’: Lashkar-e-Taiba takes credit for Uri attack which killed 20 … was last modified: October 26th, 2016 by greendecker

This article was originally published on http://www.dailymail.co.uk/indiahome/indianews/article-3871974/Drinking-glass-martyrdom-Lashkar-e-Taiba-takes-credit-Uri-attack-killed-20-Indian-soldiers.html